The Inherent Risks of Freedom

Freedom carries with it responsibilities and risks

Those who enjoy the freedoms guaranteed by our Constitution and Laws must accept the responsibility to support the same freedom for those that hold different perspectives.

We bear the burden of tolerance for those with whom we disagree in exchange for a tolerance of our own ideas.

The risks of freedom are not the same as the risks to freedom.

The laws of this nation insure that all views, religious, political, social, or personal are entitled to equal protection.

One does not have to agree with or support such diverse differences, but you cannot support or condone oppression.

The sole exception is to remove those who refuse to tolerate  others, or seek to impose their beliefs on others by force or law.

Thus the risks of freedom include the necessary evil of tolerating those that may hold abhorrent beliefs (Neo-Nazis, KKK, Supremacists of any color, racists) so long as they do not try to impose their beliefs or break the law.

However, the reality of the world is it can be a dangerous one. The risks to freedom are often masked as attempts to preserve it.

So it comes down to a simple decision. Do we live in fear? Do we sacrifice our long-held hard fought for principles of equality?

Or do we stand up to it?

The single greatest tool against the fanaticism of fundamentalism and intolerance is education. The free exchange of ideas and knowledge.  Embracing intelligence and education seems to be woefully out of fashion in this country.

What is needed today, along with the reality of a strong military, is a 21st century version of Radio Free America.

The spread of knowledge will someday negate the need for force if we just use the best qualities of America.

Perhaps, in the not so distant future, the next generations who occupy this earth and the universe, will look back on this time as the moment the United States of America once again led the world by virtue of our courage and intelligence, not just our miltary might.

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About Joe Broadmeadow

Joe Broadmeadow retired with the rank of Captain from the East Providence Police Department after serving for 20 years. He is the author of the novels Collision Course, Silenced Justice, and Saving the Last Dragon available on Amazon in print and Kindle. Joe is working o the latest in a series of Josh Williams and Harrison "Hawk" Bennett novels and a sequel to Saving the Last Dragon. In 2014 Joe completed a 2,185 mile thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail
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